In order to have a more personal URL for your Beeple tool and to be able to send emails from your own email domain, you need to add some DNS (Domain Name System) settings on your own domain. Here's a quick help guide.

These following things need to be adapted by you. To do so, you need access to your company's domain settings. In case you do not have access, you can ask your IT department to do it for you.

  • A CNAME-record needs to be added to be able to use the URL that gives access to the site. A Canonical Name record (abbreviated as CNAME record) is a type of resource record used to specify that a domain name is an alias for another domain (the 'canonical' domain).
  • A DNS TXT record needs to be added as well. A TXT record (short for text record) is a type of resource record used to provide the ability to associate arbitrary text with a host or other name, such as human readable information about a server, network, data center, or other accounting information.
  • A DKIM DNS record needs to be added, make sure that this record is on 1 line. DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) is an email authentication method designed to detect email spoofing. It allows the receiver to check that an email claimed to have come from a specific domain was indeed authorized by the owner of that domain.
  • An SPF DNS record needs to be added, to prevent that mail servers ignore the mails sent from Beeple. An SPF record is a TXT record that is part of a domain's DNS zone file. The TXT record specifies a list of authorized host names/IP addresses that mail can originate from for a given domain name.

Above is an example of a DNS board. Keep in mind that in some DNS management boards, the domain is already present. In that case, you can leave out .domainname. Always copy the part before "TXT" in the left field (here green) and the part after "TXT" in the right field (here blue). 

Your Customer Success Manager at Beeple will share the exact DNS settings with you while creating your Beeple site. These differ from one customer to another.

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